Harvard, Stanford, and MIT Researchers Have Found the Secret to Success

We want to believe that talent and opportunity are equally abundant. Not so, according to this ground-breaking study of 1 million inventors. There’s a popular quote attributed to Leila Janah, “Talent is equally distributed, opportunity is not.” We can argue what “equally distributed” really means, but I’d submit that neither talent nor opportunity are equally “available” to all people. In ...

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FourSight: Innovation when it works and when it fails

An Innov8ors Miami Keynote by Sarah Thurber Last year Innov8rs embarked on a year-long research project to better understand: who are corporate innovators? What makes them tick? What makes their efforts succeed and fail? We partnered with FourSight, creators of the FourSight Thinking Profile, to assess more than 350 innovators from around the world. We collected data from Europe, Asia, ...

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Cooperation in Teams – Contracting Level 1: Administrative Contract

Leading and Managing Teams

One of the things we know is that contracting is very important to create a cooperative relationship. And in the past, we’ve explained what is actually a contract. Now, we’re going to talk about the three levels of contracting and specifically this time, level one. Contracting Level 1: Administrative Contract Level one is how do you create an administrative, what ...

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How to Staff Your Startup Team

Every entrepreneur who has succeeded or failed (is there a difference?) has advice about how to get the right people on the bus. What questions should you ask at the interview? What character traits should you seek and how do you do that? How much is science and how much is just going with your gut and whether you click? What Google ...

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If You Want to Change the World …

You Need To Start With Small Groups, Loosely Connected But United By A Shared Purpose In 1847, a young doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis had a major breakthrough. Working in a maternity ward, he discovered that a regime of hand washing could dramatically lower the incidence of childbed fever. Unfortunately, the medical establishment rejected his ideas and the germ theory of ...

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Are other peoples’ fears the cause of your frustration?

I was working with a pharmaceutical distribution business that needed to innovate, and fast. Drugs were coming off-patent, and industry forces were going to change who made money and how. The MD was worried. He was also frustrated that his senior managers, who he described as excellent operations people, were failing to come up with innovative responses to the new ...

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Sky is the Limit: Intrapreneurship at Air France

Marine Gall is VP Innovation & Intrapreneurship Programs at Air France, working on innovation, business synergies, transformation, change management, and customer centric items. She kindly accepted to tell us more about the intrapreneurship program which is now starting its season 2, “Boosting the future”, and has just selected 6 laureates for its 2019 season. 1) Hi Marine, could tell us ...

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10 Things to Change About Physician Behavior

Disrupting sick care is the new parlor game. Of course, even the guy who coined the term “disruptive” now feels he has to defend himself, so I guess the good news is that we are becoming the victims of our own success. Most of the talk has been about changing patient/customer/consumer/prosumer/client behavior. The assumption is that engaging patients will create better health ...

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Cognitive Diversity is the DNA of Innovation

Katrina Sherrerd, CEO of Research Affiliates, poses an interesting challenge, “Achieving cognitive diversity is easier said than done. We all have a neurobiological preference for comfort and familiarity over discomfort and the unknown. Human nature inclines us toward people and ideas that confirm and reflect our views. Only when we resist and suppress our instincts can we build teams of ...

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