Tag Archives: innovative thinking

Innovator Mindset – Best Problem Solvers Win

I’d like to make the case that life is fundamentally about figuring things out. We enter the world possessing a quite remarkable biomechanical device with powerful software already installed. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) there’s no owner’s manual, not even a schematic or the most minimal specs (which we couldn’t make sense of if we had them). So from the moment ...

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Innovation and the Business Ecosystem

Innovation is driving change in the business ecosystem and the dynamics of this change are remarkably similar to those found in nature. Several years ago biologists studied the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and its impact on plant growth. This may seem like an odd connection to explore since wolves don’t eat plants. However the elk that wolves ...

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Mindset Comes Before Innovation

In a previous post here – Innovation is Not Problem Solving, I chose a title I knew was provocative, and one I labored over. I debated with myself over whether to perhaps make it: Innovation is Not Necessarily Problem Solving, or …is Not Always Problem Solving, or …is More Than Problem Solving. I chose the blunter version partly to see ...

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Innovation Essentials – Unlearning

It goes without saying that to successfully innovate, we need to be willing to learn new things. What doesn’t get said as often is that we also need to be willing to unlearn old things—and that’s often the more important task. One of the central challenges innovators manage to overcome is the tendency to cling to past assumptions and beliefs ...

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Innovators are Effectual Thinkers

Innovation is less about causal thinking than it is about effectual thinking. I confess I didn’t know “effectual” was a word until I was recently directed to the ground breaking research of Dr. Saras Sarasvathy, a professor at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. She interviewed 45 successful entrepreneurs. (Or, more accurately, asked them to think out loud ...

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