Tag Archives: Google

Innovation Risk & Return: Horizons, Uncertainty and the Teddy Bear Principle

I’ve had a couple of interesting conversations recently focused on the strategic view of innovation using the 3 Horizons framework originally proposed by McKinsey, and the assessment of risk and return from innovation. The 3 Horizons approach can be used to manage different areas of future business concurrently, albeit with different managerial approaches given the different requirements and characteristics.

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Stop Innovating!

Do you think they have “innovation days” at Google, GoPro, and Netflix? At these companies, every day is innovation day! At Google, everyone gets 20% time to do whatever he/she wants. Most of Google’s new products and features come from this kind of tinkering and in-house organic hustle. They don’t come from planning or innovation days.

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How A Driverless Car Sees The Road

Statistically, the least reliable part of the car is ... the driver. Chris Urmson heads up Google's driverless car program, one of several efforts to remove humans from the driver's seat. He talks about where his program is right now, and shares fascinating footage that shows how the car sees the road and makes autonomous decisions about what to do next.

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Microsoft Tries to Disrupt Mobile Phone Market

I came across an article on Mashable recently highlighting a new Microsoft experiment. It highlights something that Microsoft has prototyped to test as part of their strategy to regain momentum in the mobile phone market by focusing on markets outside the United States where the first generation of the smartphone adoption battle hasn't already been decided.

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Nerd Fight – Microsoft Hololens vs. Google Glass

Wow! I have to start that word, because I'm not sure how else to describe what has just emerged from Microsoft Research in the new Microsoft HoloLens. And as I say in the title, if you watch the video below you'll clearly see that Microsoft has just broke Google Glass - both lenses. It's probably no coincidence that Google closed down Glass as a public project just days before Microsoft's announcement.

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