Tag Archives: change

The Change Challenge for Innovation Consultants

In many ways, the consulting industry specializing in innovation is its own worst enemy. They are resolutely staying very internally driven, self promoting, still trying to convey the story of mastery when clearly this is lacking and failing the client, who is increasingly requiring more organic or holistic solutions not a piecemeal of innovation offerings. These often don’t dovetail into one complete innovation system because they are supplied by a variety of different service providers all having their own ‘pet’ approaches.

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The Rock in Your Shoe

Many who have claimed to be innovative leaders rested comfortably in the hope that they would continually lead “in the flow” because they believed they’d have an accurate understanding of what laid ahead. Sure there were minor “tweaks” along the way, but these leaders comfortably sat atop inflatable tubes riding the lazy river of predictability – and prayed that the river would never bend.

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Plan to be Punched in the Face

Experienced leaders know how just easily the most carefully crafted plan can go awry, particularly in the innovation process. In his new Little Black Book of Innovation, Scott Anthony cautions against betting the farm on the perfect plan. “No business plan survives first contact with the market,” Anthony says.

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40 Reasons Why We Struggle with Innovation

The fuzzy front end of innovation confronts you with a lot of questions. For the new edition of my book Creating innovative Products and Services, I have posted a question on front-end innovation struggles to innovation practitioners in more than 20 Linkedin groups. The response was massive. I made a list of forty reasons why people struggle starting innovation in their companies in daily practice.

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Customer Value Pulses

Customer value pulses are targeted waves that result in steady, rhythmic increases in market growth and value production. Market growth and value production can each happen independently, but then you experience them as propped up by your effort, leaning heavy on the work you must continue just to keep them alive. Better to bring the two together and let them support each other, even create synergies together.

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