Psychology

Educating Future Innovators

Are our schools preparing pupils to cope with the workplace of tomorrow or are they preparing them to pass exams today? To succeed in a digital world rich in information and innovation, future skilled workers will need the ability to analyse problems, think critically, think creatively, find new solutions and have the courage to take risks and to cope with failure.

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Innovate Like a Flaneur

I recently wrote about my appreciation of travel writing (Innovation in Lost Japan). One of my favorite ways to pass time converges in the form of the literary tales of the flaneur. The French term, which means a person who strolls about, was popularized by Charles Baudelaire in the 19th century..

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Too Busy to Innovate

I've begun to wonder if the concept of innovation in large corporation is an exercise in pointless navel gazing. And no, this isn't another bashing of brainstorming, or a recent conversion based on my experiences with faulty innovation logic. No, the challenge to innovation is based on the recent development of a core strength: focus, efficiency, time management.

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The Art Elements of Work

We've all heard the cliches: "If you're going to do something, do it right," and "If you want something done right, do it yourself." Change one word -- "right" to "artfully" -- and the view of work as art is not the far reach it may appear to be. But allow me to state my case more, er, artfully.

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Making Innovation Second Nature

Athletes understand the concept of muscle memory. That is, the experience your body has performing specific activities that are consistently practiced until they become second nature. Why does something that seems so evident on its face in one activity, athletics, seem so unusual in other aspects of our lives, such as business?

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