Author Archives: Scott Bowden

Innovation Lessons of Failure and Credit

Perhaps two of the greatest challenges faced by corporate innovators are failure and credit. The linkage between these two concepts is more profound than the oft-quoted proverb “success has many fathers, failure is an orphan.” Recurring failure leading to a stunning breakthrough is the stuff of legend in the innovation world, ranging from Edison’s numerous ineffective early light bulb designs that preceded his incandescent immortality to Steve Jobs’ well-publicized failures at NeXT computing prior to his triumphant return to Apple.

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Innovating Fast and Slow

In recent years our understanding of the workings of the brain has increased dramatically. Science has provided meaningful insights into the mechanics of how we think, with business implications for everything from marketing to organizational behavior. Innovators, too, can benefit from these findings.

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More Innovation Lessons from Big Pharma

I recently wrote in these pages about how Innovation Practitioners can benefit from leveraging concepts that the leading pharmaceutical companies are using to transform their approach to Research and Development. Apparently this transformation is not limited to Big Pharma’s R&D. In a recent Wall Street Journal article, Jonathan Rockoff writes about recent changes underway to the salesforces at Big Pharma. Understanding those changes can bear fruit for students of innovation.

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Innovation Lessons from Big Pharma

In a recent Op/Ed in the Wall Street Journal, Dr. Scott Gottlieb of the American Enterprise Institute identifies three lessons learned by the leading pharmaceutical companies in their R&D efforts. These findings are applicable to other industries as well and can be of benefit to practitioners of innovation.

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What Innovation Can Learn from Depression

In his new book A First-Rate Madness, Dr. Nassir Ghaemi posits that some of the key attributes associated with depression and mental illness (realism, empathy, resilience, and creativity) also provide the foundation for successful leadership in politics, military engagements, and business. As I listened to an interview with Dr. Ghaemi, head of the Mood Disorders Program at Tufts Medical Center, I wondered if these same characteristics of leaders suffering from depression might also be useful tools for those of us tasked with delivering innovation in our organizations.

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