Author Archives: Mike Shipulski

The Three R’s of Innovation – Risk, Reward, and Resources

The Three Rs of Innovation – Risk, Reward, and Resources

Is it innovation or continuous improvement or is it innovation? Is it regular innovation or disruptive innovation? Is it new enough or too new? These questions are worse than meaningless as they suck emotional energy from the organization and divert emotional energy from the business objective. With every initiative, there are risks, rewards, and resources. Risk generally tracks with newness, ...

Read More »

The HOW and WHY of Innovation

Innovation is difficult because it demands new work. But, at a more basic level, it’s difficult because it requires an admission that the way you’ve done things is no longer viable. And, without public admission the old way won’t carry the day, innovation cannot move forward. After the admission there’s no innovation, but it’s one step closer. After a public ...

Read More »

Companies don’t innovate, people do.

Big companies hold tightly to what they have until they feel threatened by upstarts, and not before. They mobilize only when they see their sales figures dip below the threshold of tolerability, and no sooner. And if they’re the market leaders, they delay their mobilization through rationalization. The dip is due to general economic slowdown that is out of our ...

Read More »

Dismantle the Business Model

When companies want to innovate, there are three things they can change – products, services, and business models. Products are usually the first, second and third priorities. Services, though they have a tighter connection with the customer and are more lasting and powerful are, sadly, fourth priority. Business models are the superset and the most powerful of all, yet...

Read More »

Diabolically Simple Prototypes

If Camp A says it will work and Camp B says it won’t, a prototype will settle the disagreement pretty quickly. It will work or it won’t. And if it works, the idea behind it is valid. And if it doesn’t, the idea may be valid, but a workable solution is yet-to-be-discovered. Either way, a prototype brings clarity.

Read More »

Mental Models and Dangerous Expectations

Expectations result from mental models and wants. When you have a mental model of a system and you want the system to behave in a way that fits your mental model, that’s an expectation. And when you want the system to behave differently than your mental model, that’s also an expectation. When the system matches your wants, the world is ...

Read More »