Author Archives: Jeffrey Phillips

We Don't Need Another Innovation Hero

James Gardner, an innovator, blogger and author whom I respect, has a new post out today that talks about the need for a “new kind of hero“. He’s referencing innovation heroes like Steve Jobs. As you may believe, some Apple supporters and investors are in a bit of a tizzy, wondering if Apple can continue it’s great streak of successful ...

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Importance of Discovery to Innovation

Last week I wrote about becoming a “fast discoverer“, which was primarily about using experimentation to find new ideas. What struck me as I contemplated the need for more experimentation is how frequently many businesses will ask for new ideas and accept them because “experts” said they were correct. As innovators, you need to experience these needs and participate in ...

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Forget About Being a Fast Follower

Become a Fast Discoverer with Experimentation by Jeffrey Phillips One data point is interesting, two points define a line and three points are a trend. Today in my Twitter feed were several articles and stories about the interrelationship between innovation and experiments. When you see a trend, especially one that makes sense, it’s important to call it out, discuss it ...

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The W's of Innovation

When I was coming along in school, back in the dark ages when we still used the wide tablets and the short, fat pencils, we were taught a fair bit about writing. Unfortunately, little of that learning gets reflected here. One of the items we were taught was how to write a great introductory newspaper article. As I recall, the ...

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4 Reasons Why Innovative Ideas Fail

Frankly, I’d rather write about success than failure, especially in an innovation setting. But since it’s true that success has many fathers and failure is an orphan, someone needs to tell its story. We’ve all heard the mantra (and I’ve used it many times) that innovation will require some failure. In this regard what we are talking about primarily is ...

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Has America Lost its Innovation Edge?

Recently, Norm Augustine wrote an article for Forbes entitled Danger: America is losing its edge in innovation. In the article Augustine cites a number of factors, such as the often Tweeted fact that US consumers spend more on potato chips than the government does in Energy Research and Development. He also points to the fact that science and engineering are ...

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Clinging to Innovation Tools

It’s reached the point where I’ve lost track of all the innovation tools available. It seems that every week I stumble across another innovation tool, method or technique. Much to my chagrin, since an innovation consultant should know most, if not all, of the possible permutations and combinations of tools and techniques in his chosen field. I mean, after all, ...

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Innovate and They Will Come

I know I’m late responding to this ad by Accenture, but I saw it today in the airport and it made me smile. Why? Because it is so “Field of Dreams”. There are so many assertions that are wrong with the statement that one hardly knows where to begin. First, innovation should be pursued in context of user needs. Inside-out ...

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Is Innovation an Unqualified Good?

I love blogging, and I love blog comments even more. I get a chance to interact, at least from a short text perspective, with people who agree, and who disagree with my writing and points of view. There’s nothing better than a dispute or debate over ideas. One of the comments on my recent post “Why Innovation makes Executives Uncomfortable” ...

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Creating an Innovation Community at U.S. Bank

One of the most pervasive myths about innovation is that it happens to isolated individuals who have a spark of creativity. The story unfolds that through trial and tribulation, the lonely innovator overcomes obstacles and eventually creates a compelling new product. While that story is entertaining, it is for the most part a fairy tale. Most experienced innovators can tell ...

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