Author Archives: Greg Satell

Is Your Platform Burning?

In 1892, George Eastman formed the Eastman Kodak Company to “make the camera as convenient as a pencil.” The idea took off and by the early 20th century, Kodak had become one of America’s largest companies and Eastman one of its most successful entrepreneurs. What made Kodak so successful was not just its products, but...

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Where to Look for the Next Big Thing

Usually tales of great discovery begin with a flash of inspiration, like when Watson and Crick first imagined a double helix and then quickly realized that they had discovered the structure of DNA; or an accident, like when Alexander Fleming contaminated his bacteria culture and stumbled onto penicillin.

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The 9 Rules of Innovation

So who deserves credit? Engelbart for coming up with the idea? Taylor and Kay for engineering solutions around it? Jobs for creating a marketable product that made an impact on the world? Strong arguments can be made for each, as well as for many others not mentioned here. The truth is that there are many paths to innovation. Here are nine of them.

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Why Some Movements Succeed and Others Fail

On September 17, 2011, Occupy Wall Street took over Zuccotti Park, in the heart of the financial district in Lower Manhattan. Declaring, “We are the 99%,” they captured the attention of the nation. Within a few months, however, the park was cleared and the protesters went home, achieving little, if anything.

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Collaboration Is The New Competitive Advantage

In truth, neither view fully represents today’s business environment. Certainly, companies like Apple and Southwest are still able to dominate their industries, but the source of advantage has changed. We no longer compete in a resource economy, but a semantic economy where firms that can build, manage and widen connections win out.

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Success: The one thing nobody ever tells you about failure

These days, there is no shortage of advice on how to be successful. Learning to code, creating disruption and even Montessori schools are commonly cited examples. But they are no more helpful than, “learn to do heart surgery”, “come up with a great idea and “go to Harvard.”

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