Author Archives: Greg Satell

How Fantasy Becomes Reality

When H.G. Wells was born in 1866, there was no electricity or cars or even indoor plumbing. Still, his active imagination conjured up a world of time machines, space travel and genetic engineering. This was all completely fantasy, but his books foresaw many modern inventions, such as email, lasers and nuclear energy. It’s no accident that people who invent the ...

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Intel Has Figured Out How To Compute In 3 Dimensions And It Could Put The Company Back On Top

In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore published a remarkably prescient paper, which predicted that the number of transistors on a computer chip would double about every two years. For a half century, this process of doubling has proved to be so remarkably consistent that today it is commonly known as Moore’s Law and has driven the digital revolution. For most ...

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The Little Known Event that Made Einstein a Legendary Icon

On April 3rd, 1921, a handful of journalists went to interview a relatively unknown scientist named Albert Einstein. When they arrived to meet his ship they found a crowd of thousands waiting for him, screaming with adulation. Surprised at his popularity, and charmed by his genial personality, the story of Einstein’s arrival made the front page in major newspapers. It ...

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Value Never Actually Disappears, It Just Shifts From One Place To Another

Earlier this year, I published an article about no-code software platforms, which was very well received. Before long, however, I began to get angry — and sometimes downright nasty — comments from software engineers who were horrified by the notion that you can produce software without actually understanding the code behind it. Of course, no-code platforms don’t obviate the need for software ...

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How Trust Can Be A Competitive Advantage

One of the most rewarding things about writing my book Mapping Innovation was talking to the innovators themselves. All of them were prominent (one recently won the Nobel Prize), but I found them to be the among the kindest and most generous people you can imagine, nothing like the difficult and mercurial stereotype. At first, this may seem counterintuitive, because ...

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When Innovation Goes Wrong, We Shouldn’t Blame Technology, But Ourselves

When I speak at conferences, I’ve noticed that people are increasingly asking me about the unintended consequences of technological advance. As our technology becomes almost unimaginably powerful, there is growing apprehension and fear that we will be unable to control what we create. This, of course, isn’t anything new. When trains first appeared, many worried that human bodies would melt ...

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Digital Transformation Is Human Transformation

A decade ago, many still questioned the relevance of digital technology. While Internet penetration was already significant, e-commerce made up less than 4% of retail sales. Mobile and cloud computing were just getting started and artificial intelligence was still more science fiction than reality. Yet today, all of those things are not only viable technologies, but increasingly key to effectively ...

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How To Create Something Truly Original

I study innovators for a living. Every year, I interview dozens of men and women who’ve achieved remarkable things. For my own part, I publish about a hundred articles a year and my second book, Cascades, will come out this spring. While my achievements pale in comparison to many of those I interview, many believe my work to be original. ...

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The Genomics Revolution Is Now Moving At Full Steam. Here’s What It’s All About:

We tend to think of innovation as a single event, but the truth is that it’s an extended process of discovery, engineering and transformation. First, a scientist discovers a new phenomenon, then others figure out to use that knowledge to create a viable solution to an existing problem and finally a particular industry or field is transformed. This process usually ...

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