Author Archives: Greg Satell

Materials Science May Be The Most Important Technology Of The Next Decade. Here’s Why:

Think of just about any major challenge we will face over the next decade and materials are at the center of it. To build a new clean energy future, we need more efficient solar panels, wind turbines and batteries. Manufacturers need new materials to create more advanced products. We also need to replace materials subject to supply disruptions, like rare ...

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If You Want to Change the World …

You Need To Start With Small Groups, Loosely Connected But United By A Shared Purpose In 1847, a young doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis had a major breakthrough. Working in a maternity ward, he discovered that a regime of hand washing could dramatically lower the incidence of childbed fever. Unfortunately, the medical establishment rejected his ideas and the germ theory of ...

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The One Genius Google Innovation Strategy That You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

It’s no secret that Google is one of the most innovative companies on the planet. Besides pioneering and then dominating the search industry, it has also become a leader in developing futuristic technologies such as artificial intelligence, driverless cars and quantum computing. It has even launched a life science company. What makes Google so successful is not one particular process, but how it integrates multiple ...

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How IBM Sees The Future Of Artificial Intelligence

Ever since IBM’s Watson system defeated the best human champions at the game show Jeopardy!, artificial intelligence (AI) has been the buzzword of choice. More than just hype, intelligent systems are revolutionizing fields from medicine and manufacturing to changing fundamental assumptions about how science is done. Yet for all the progress, it appears that we are closer to the beginning ...

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How Fantasy Becomes Reality

When H.G. Wells was born in 1866, there was no electricity or cars or even indoor plumbing. Still, his active imagination conjured up a world of time machines, space travel and genetic engineering. This was all completely fantasy, but his books foresaw many modern inventions, such as email, lasers and nuclear energy. It’s no accident that people who invent the ...

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Intel Has Figured Out How To Compute In 3 Dimensions And It Could Put The Company Back On Top

In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore published a remarkably prescient paper, which predicted that the number of transistors on a computer chip would double about every two years. For a half century, this process of doubling has proved to be so remarkably consistent that today it is commonly known as Moore’s Law and has driven the digital revolution. For most ...

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The Little Known Event that Made Einstein a Legendary Icon

On April 3rd, 1921, a handful of journalists went to interview a relatively unknown scientist named Albert Einstein. When they arrived to meet his ship they found a crowd of thousands waiting for him, screaming with adulation. Surprised at his popularity, and charmed by his genial personality, the story of Einstein’s arrival made the front page in major newspapers. It ...

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Value Never Actually Disappears, It Just Shifts From One Place To Another

Earlier this year, I published an article about no-code software platforms, which was very well received. Before long, however, I began to get angry — and sometimes downright nasty — comments from software engineers who were horrified by the notion that you can produce software without actually understanding the code behind it. Of course, no-code platforms don’t obviate the need for software ...

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How Trust Can Be A Competitive Advantage

One of the most rewarding things about writing my book Mapping Innovation was talking to the innovators themselves. All of them were prominent (one recently won the Nobel Prize), but I found them to be the among the kindest and most generous people you can imagine, nothing like the difficult and mercurial stereotype. At first, this may seem counterintuitive, because ...

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