Author Archives: Drew Boyd

Innovation Pilot Program

Companies can reduce the risk of adopting new innovation methods by testing them first. A short, pilot program that addresses a specific product or service line helps you understand whether a new method is right for your company. Pilot programs help keep your costs in line, and they help you reduce resistance to adopting new methods. To organize an innovation ...

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Innovation Competency Model

To build innovation muscle, companies must include innovation in their competency models. A competency is a persistent pattern of behavior resulting from a cluster of knowledge, skills, abilities, and motivations. Competency models formalize that behavior and make it persistent. They prescribe the ideal patterns needed for exceptional performance. They help diagnose and evaluate employee performance. It takes a lot of ...

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Don't Brand Your Innovation Program

Companies should avoid the temptation to brand their innovation program. While it seems like a great way to bring excitement and focus to innovation, branding these programs does just the opposite. Employees become cynical, they wait it out, and they go right back to doing what they were doing before. I liken this advice to that from Edwards Deming on ...

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Innovation for the Non-Profit Sector

Non-profit organizations need innovation every bit as much as for-profit firms. Some might argue they need it more because they lack the resources and cash flow of large commercial firms. Non-profits need innovation in: Fund Raising Expanding their reach Mission delivery Resource utilization The need for innovation in the non-profit sector is widely recognized. Awards, grants, and other forms of ...

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Innovating Athletic Shoes

The athletic footwear market is maturing, so it will need sustained innovation to keep growing. “Performance footwear” emerged with the ancient Greeks and has since grown to a $50 billion global industry. Innovations such as vulcanized rubber, high tops, arch support, specialized functions, endorsements, and branding have kept the industry vibrant and growing, especially for the dominant three players: Nike, ...

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Innovation and Humor

A church needed a new bell ringer. When a man with no arms applied for the job, the doubting priest asked, “Can you ring the bell?” The applicant climbed the bell tower, took a running start, and plowed his face into the bell producing a beautiful tone. He suddenly slipped, fell to the ground, and died. The crowd of onlookers ...

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Crowdsourcing and the Task Unification Tool

Crowdsourcing has a crowd of critics. Crowdsourcing is the notion of distributed problem-solving where problems are broadcast to large groups of solvers in the form of an open call for solutions. The belief is that the “wisdom of the crowd” yields superior results over what individuals can do. The use of the term has spread to just about any activity ...

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Marketing Innovation – The Inversion Tool

Creating innovative TV commercials is more effective when using patterns embedded in other innovative commercials. Professor Jacob Goldenberg and his colleagues discovered that 89% of 200 award winning ads fall into a few simple, well-defined design structures. Their latest book, Cracking the Ad Code, defines eight of these structures and provides a step-by-step approach to use them. Here are the ...

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Creating Blackberry Innovations with S.I.T.

Blackberry is taking a shellacking from iPhone and Android. It’s market share has declined 4% in four months. Why? The company drifted from a strategy built around its core competency and is frantically chasing its app-crazed competitors. Though Blackberry defined the smart phone category, it will lose its lead unless it changes. Blackberry needs innovation. This month’s LAB outlines an ...

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Innovating Political Elections with Division

In honor of election day in the United States I thought I would run this post: The Division template of the corporate innovation method, S.I.T., works by listing the components of the product or service, then dividing out a component either physically, functionally, or by preserving the characteristics of the whole. Here is a unique example of the Division template ...

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