Author Archives: Braden Kelley

Where's Your Innovation Friction?

How should firms develop the organizational structure, culture, and incentives (e.g., for teams) to encourage successful innovation? When it comes to creating an innovation culture, often people make it far too complicated. If you're part of the senior leadership team and you're serious about innovation then your job is simple - reduce friction. If you're serious about innovation and you're not a senior leader, then your job is to do what you can to convince senior leadership that innovation is important. Then, gently help your execs see the areas of greatest friction in your organization so they can do something about it.

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The Code for Successful Innovation

I had the opportunity to attend the Front End of Innovation a couple of years ago in Boston and of the three days of sessions, I have to say that unlike most people, my favorite session was that of Dr. Clotaire Rapaille. The author of "The Culture Code: An Ingenious Way to Understand Why People Around the World Live and Buy as They Do", Dr. Rapaille extolled the crowd with his thoughts on 'codes' and 'imprints'.

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Social Media is the Glue of Innovation

Social Media is the Glue of Innovation

What is the role of social media in innovation (either inside or outside the organization)? Social media serves an incredibly important role in innovation. Social media functions as the glue to stick together incomplete knowledge, incomplete ideas, incomplete teams, and incomplete skillsets. Social media is not some mysterious magic box. Ultimately it is a tool that serves to connect people and information. I'm reminded of a set of lyrics from U2's "The Fly":

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Do you have an Anti-Creativity Checklist?

In order to build a culture capable of encouraging innovation or creativity (or both), you must first do an inventory of the psychology and mental models in play in your organization. One great way to do this would be to build an 'anti-innovation checklist' or an 'anti-creativity checklist'. If you start watching the vocabulary that people use in meetings where ideas are being discussed, the behavior of senior leadership as it relates to these areas, and most importantly - how people respond - you'll get a better sense of where your organizational challenges lie with respect to innovation and creativity. Wouldn't that make such an exercise of great value to an organization?

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Trendspotting Trifecta

'Who should be responsible (if anyone) for trend-spotting and putting emerging behaviors and needs into context for a business?' I believe this question should really be broken up because there are three VERY different (and incredibly important) pursuits intermingled here:

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10 Steps to a Solid Innovation Foundation

You know how sometimes when you order a product you get this inch-thick instruction manual that you never read, but also how there is sometimes a QuickStart Guide of 5-10 simple steps to get you up and running quickly? Well, Stoking Your Innovation Bonfire is the instruction manual that an increasing number of organizations are ordering for teams to help them with their innovation efforts. But, I’m sure companies could also use an Innovation QuickStart. So, here is one you could use (excerpted in part from my book):

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Innovation and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

Now that our local Blockbuster has gone out of business, we've made the jump and joined Netflix (although I will miss taking trips to Blockbuster with my daughter). The first disc in my queue to arrive was the venerable, enjoyable Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. I was very excited to share this musical celebration of innovation with my daughter last night.

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The Nine Innovation Roles

I'm seeing an increasing number of articles about innovation personalities and the like, and I'm a firm believer that it's not personalities that matter so much when it comes to innovation, it's the roles that we play in making innovation happen (or not). So, I would like to add my Nine Innovation Roles to the conversation.

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