Author Archives: Jeffrey Phillips

Innovation – Speed as an Enabler, Feature, Benefit

Over the last few posts I've been writing about the relationship between speed, velocity and innovation. So far we've decided that velocity matters (velocity is speed in a specific direction) because the pace of the market is increasing, and as it increases product lifecycles become shorter, meaning new products and services must be introduced more rapidly and more frequently simply to maintain competitive position.

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How Fast Should You Innovate?

In my last two posts I've identified the need for speed, or velocity, as an outcome of innovation. What many firms fail to realize is that the game has changed. The rate of change in the environment has increased, and to remain "in the same place" as your firm is today - merely to hold serve - you must accelerate your product and service development capabilities.

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How to be More Innovative in 5 Easy Steps

This is one of those posts where the topic feels so large and so poorly defined as to be almost impossible to describe. Yet we get this question all the time - what can we do to be more innovative? Every firm is in a rush to become more innovative, yet few have the time, resource or attention required. I'm going to address in this post how to create an innovation discipline, since we believe that is the only way to sustain competitive advantage.

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Why IT Says No to Innovation

Pity the IT manager. He (or she) is increasingly under pressure from product managers, business line leaders and others who want "innovation". Whether that's more data, or more insight from their data, or perhaps the product manager wants to deploy a new product - innovation is a constant demand. And while the IT folks would love to support innovation, they more often than not say "no". Who, in this day and age, can possibly say "no" to innovation?

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Irresistible Innovation meets Immovable Object

I'm going to let you in on a secret. Doing innovation isn't really all that hard, once you get the hang of it. Yes, there are dozens of methodologies and approaches. You can tap into your employees and/or your customer base for ideas. You can search for interesting technologies in research labs and universities. You can prototype, test and tweak ideas based on customer pilots. In fact, you can do just about anything in innovation. That is, if you can get it started.

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