Monthly Archives: September 2019

Harvard Study Reveals One Exercise That Predicts 96% Lower Cardiovascular Risk

In less that 10 minutes you can gauge your risk of a heart disease or a cardiac event by doing this exercise. Cardiovascular diseases ranks as the number cause of death worldwide. And while it’s well known that even moderate exercise can significantly lower cardiovascular risk, diagnosing that risk has often involved numerous expensive clinical tests. I’ve written in the ...

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De-Risking Corporate Innovation by Using Suppliers

In this column we have analyzed why it is nearly impossible for Corporate Innovation teams to successfully commercialize new products, services, and business models both within and outside of their core business at length. The risks alone make Legal and Brand departments quake, quiver, and fight against these innovations. The use of new channels, new materials, or partners makes product ...

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When to pull the plug and learn from failure

Creating a new venture, championing a new process or offering a new course or program is exciting. However, statistically, it is more likely you will fail than succeed and there is a fine line between determination and pig-headed optimism. You might not have the skills to do what you love. At some point, you will have to consider quitting and moving ...

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Here’s How We’re Killing Innovation In America

Throughout America’s history, technological innovation has been key to security and prosperity. Whether it was through entrepreneurs like Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and Thomas Watson, or government programs like the Manhattan Project, the Apollo Program and the Human Genome Project, The United States has been on the cutting edge. Today, as we enter a new era of innovation, America remains ...

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You’re Looking For Love In All The Wrong Places

We’ll give virtually anything to find it but what if it’s already here and you just aren’t paying attention? You’d have been hard-pressed today to avoid the many arrows being slung from Cupid’s social media armies. They’ve invaded your timelines, feeds, texts, emails, and, if you’re lucky enough, perhaps they’ve even delivered a dozen or so of the more than ...

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A Little Uninterrupted Work Goes a Long Way

If your day doesn’t start with a list of things you want to get done, there’s little chance you’ll get them done. What if you spent thirty minutes to define what you want to get done and then spent an hour getting them done? In ninety minutes you’ll have made a significant dent in the most important work. It doesn’t ...

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Increased R&D Doesn’t Mean Innovation

A recent PwC study looked at a large rise in global R&D spending in 2018, more than a 17% gain over 2017. Many pundits shared the article as evidence of an innovation revolution despite the warnings in the article. Silly, huh? The piece states, “rising R&D spending is an indication that companies are committing to the future, and should portend ...

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4 Things All Managers Must Know About Digital Transformation But Don’t

Today, technology has become central to how every business competes. Futuristic advancements like artificial intelligence, big data and cloud computing are no longer pie-in-the-sky propositions, but mission critical initiatives that leaders are racing to implement within their organizations. Unfortunately, most  of these initiatives fail. In fact, McKinsey found that fewer than a third of organizational transformations succeed. That’s incredibly sobering. ...

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How NASA Used an Unforgettable Image to Brilliantly Communicate a Big Message

In Arthur C. Clarke’s classic Space Odyssey Sci-fi series a recurring theme is the presence of a large back monolith built by an ancient civilization. The monolith has transformational powers that alter the trajectory of humanity, starting with our ancient cave-dwelling ancestors and then following our evolution through the modern day and into the future. While the questions of who ...

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Don’t Treat the Symptoms – Turn off the Pump

Find the Root Cause In August 1854, there was a deadly outbreak of cholera in the Soho district of central London. Cholera leads to diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration, and in many cases to death. Thousands of people fell ill and over 600 died. At that time, medical authorities believed that cholera was caused by ‘miasma’ – a type of ‘bad air’ ...

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