Monthly Archives: April 2019

Getting to Why

In their classic book on negotiation and persuasion, Fisher and Ury outline the steps to get to yes. They suggest the following approach: Separate the people from the problem The purpose of this step is to recognise that emotions and egos can become entangled with the problem in negotiations, and that this will adversely affect your ability to see the other party’s ...

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Game of Thrones, Star Trek and Innovation

I recently wrote a couple of articles for Innovation Excellence that explored innovation insights we can glean from science fiction writers.  In this article, I want to further expand on that topic, and ask how other authors, including William Gibson, Jules Verne and James Burke may be able to help us stretch our thinking.  And given that we are in ...

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Using Blockchain Innovation to Rebuild Trust in the Food Industry

Using Blockchain Innovation to Rebuild Trust in the Food Industry

Consumer trust is one of the biggest hurdles that the food industry is up against today. A recent Food and Health Survey uncovered a serious trust deficit between consumers and food manufacturers and suppliers, and we don’t have to look far to see why. In October 2018, J&J Snack Foods recalled its Fit & Active sandwiches from Aldi stores due to potential contamination with ...

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Okoni Innovation Agency: there is no transformation without creation

Pierre Baudry, Marc-Antoine Franc and Cécile Bernardet are respectively founding partner, partner and project director at Okoni, an new kind of Innovation Agency, which involves co-making innovation with their customers. First Cécile and Marc-Antoine guided me at Okoni premises, then Pierre took his pen to explain how their holistic approach is quite singular, and impactful on the business of their customers. ...

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The Dream Customer

In 2012, the first major collaboration between Chrysler and Fiat produced a brand new version of the classic 1970s Dodge Dart, to a lukewarm reception. Why? At least three reasons: including a manual transmission for a mainly automatic transmission buying audience; installing a European style dual clutch, for mainly American buyers and entering a tough, competitive market. Did they really ...

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Why We Need More Women In Innovation

Why We Need More Women In Innovation

Every once in a while I get a comment from an audience member after a keynote speech or from someone who read my book, Mapping Innovation, about why so few women are included. Embarrassed, I try to explain that, as in many male dominated fields, women are woefully underrepresented in science and technology. This has nothing to do with innate ...

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What is your Waterproof Teabag?

Consider for a moment these self-contradictory innovations: The solar-powered flashlight The inflatable dartboard The underwater hairdryer The waterproof teabag The concrete liferaft At first sight they look silly but each contains the germ of an interesting idea. You can charge up a solar-powered flashlight in daylight and then take it into a cave. The inflatable dartboard is easy to transport ...

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How IBM, Google and Amazon Innovate Differently

Every organization strives to innovate, but few succeed consistently over time. That’s why so many once dominant companies hit a peak and then decline. A recent study estimates that 50% of the current S&P 500 will be replaced over the next ten years. Success is supposed to breed success, but it often breeds failure. Yet IBM, Google and Amazon have ...

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