Monthly Archives: November 2018

Co-pace is Continental’s Organization to Connect Startups and Intrapreneurs

Jürgen Bilo  is Managing Director / Vice President cof Co-pace, the organization of Continental to incubate startups, and intrapreneurs. He kindly accepted to describe the activities of Co-pace, and the way it collaborates with startups. Can you describe the missions of your entity, the Co-pace? Co-pace is the start-up hub of Continental. Through our insights of the start-up ecosystem, we enable ...

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Mapping Experiences

Recently I had the opportunity to interview Jim Kalbach, author of the interesting book Mapping Experiences: A Complete Guide to Creating Value through Journeys, Blueprints, and Diagrams. Jim Kalbach is a noted author, speaker, and instructor in user experience design, information architecture, and strategy. He is currently the Head of Customer Experience with MURAL, a leading online whiteboard for digital ...

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When the Front End and Back End of Innovation Collide

This article was inspired by a recent blog by Seth Godin, where he discussed some challenges that start-ups who rely on early adopters may face when they scale up. https://seths.blog/2018/11/the-curse-of-the-low-hanging-fruit/For a start-up, early adopters who are highly engaged in a category, and/or know they have a problem, often represent easy sales.  They typically need little persuasion, are relatively easy to ...

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When the Box is the Limit

Recently I had the opportunity to interview Walter Vandervelde, author of the compelling new book When the Box is the Limit. Walter believes that creativity is a mindset. Creativity is his profession, and he adores inspiring and helping people to develop their creative potential. Be it the young and hungry wolves that are his students or the experienced professionals in ...

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Artificial Intelligence Needs Conversational Intelligence. Here’s Why:

Historically, building technology had been about capabilities and features. Engineers and product designers would come up with new things that they thought people wanted, figure out how to make them work and ship “new and improved” products. The result was often things that were maddeningly difficult to use. That began to change when Don Norman published his classic, The Design ...

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