Psychology

Can Optimism Change the Subway?

A public art project that links New York’s subway system with the idea of “optimism” is bound to attract some cynicism, if not outright ridicule. That’s because public transit everywhere in the world is one of the more popular targets for complaint, vitriol and even fist-shaking rage. However, radical optimists seek out optimism in the hardest places – and where ...

Read More »

Saving Curiosity from the Guillotine

This great topic was raised by Arthur Lok in a discussion in the Innovation Management group on LinkedIn. It made me wonder and reflect on my own level of curiosity, what this term means to me and how it effects innovation. I think we lose our sense of curiosity as we begin to build a power base that we feel ...

Read More »

Emerging Computing Paradigms

HCI (Human-Computer Interactions) science is fast evolving to deal with emerging computing paradigms. Today it is a little Cognitive Science and AI, a lot of anthropology and Social Psychology. HCI is a fascinating discipline; the field has its origin in the 80s primarily in computer science and cognitive psychology. Today it exists in a confluence with design as a discipline ...

Read More »

Using Networks to Spread Ideas

Yesterday I talked about some of the benefits and challenges of distributed innovation within organisations. One of the biggest challenges you face when you make everyone responsible for innovation is this – how do you get new ideas to spread throughout the broader group? This is part of what John and I are studying in our major research project at ...

Read More »

Battlefield Innovation Lessons for Business Leaders

Let’s be clear, business is not war. But if you are operating in a fierce marketplace then it can feel like it. Many of the methods we use in our sales campaigns, marketing strategies and competitive tactics are based on military analogies. So what lessons can business leaders today learn from the history of warfare? Here are some that seem ...

Read More »

The Selfless Gene

Contrasting expectations of species-level evolution, the classic phyletic gradualism model (left), and the punctuated equilibrium model (right). by Kevin Roberts Biology fascinates me. I love the work of Stephen Jay Gould who theorized how change in evolution happens at the edges, the margin, the fringe. He calls this ‘punctuated equilibrium’, and it explains how evolution doesn’t take place on a ...

Read More »

An Out of Body Innovation Experience

People are fascinated with the idea of human cloning after researchers cloned a sheep in 1997. The debate about the risks and benefits of human cloning rages on. What if you could clone yourself in a virtual sense? Even better, imagine cloning yourself into another person’s body? What would you feel? What would you learn? How would your life be ...

Read More »

Open Innovation Bullies

Large companies have always used their size and power to get things their way. This is no different with open innovation. So I am not surprised when I listen to people from smaller companies complain about the behaviours of large companies when they start working together. Such behaviours were confirmed by several large companies at the recent Open Innovation Summit. ...

Read More »

Creating Conditions for an Innovation Culture

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about “creating a culture of innovation”, which is what a lot of firms suggest they want to do. Of course this is a very lofty goal. Changing a corporate culture doesn’t happen easily, and it certainly doesn’t happen overnight. Yet clearly one of the most significant barriers to innovation is the entrenched culture of ...

Read More »

Killer Small Business Social CRM

Parker Smith wrote a piece that got me thinking. In Foursquare: Democratizing the Loyalty Program, he posits that Foursquare could be the loyalty program provider to small businesses. I think he’s right. Then I noticed these identical product benefits touted by the companies themselves, Foursquare and Jack Dorsey’s Square: “For example, foursquare can tell you how many times a customer ...

Read More »