Author Archives: Greg Satell

The modern world is one of the visceral abstract, in which unlikely ideas lead to important breakthroughs and seemingly useless things can become useful indeed. While hard facts define today, new value is created only when the impossible becomes possible. Continue reading

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If we’re going to win the future, we have to invest in it. Or, put another way, why isn’t what’s good for Microsoft good for the country? Continue reading

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Power is easier to gain, but harder to use or keep. This post aims to explain that it points not to the end of power, but a change in its nature. Continue reading

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The practice of science needs to be updated. Much has changed in the 70 years since 1945. In order to honor Bush’s legacy—and maintain our technological leadership—we need to adapt it to modern times. Continue reading

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Clayton Christensen Is Wrong— This Is The Real Capitalist’s Dilemma

Last year, the Clayton Christensen, one of the world’s top management thinkers, suggested that, despite being awash in cash, corporations are “failing to invest in innovations that might foster growth.” He considers this trend so insidious and pervasive that he called it the capitalist’s dilemma in Harvard Business Review. Continue reading

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Most of us live busy lives. There is work, family, maybe a hobby or two and the need for some leisure time to refresh our batteries. So the amount of things we devote serious thought to is necessarily small and we get in the habit of not paying attention to much that goes on around us. Continue reading

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As Walter Isaacson argues in his book The Innovators, even in technology—maybe especially in technology—the ability to collaborate effectively is decisive. In order to innovate, it’s not enough to just come up with big ideas, you also need to work hard to communicate them clearly. Continue reading

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