Magic Eye 3D and the Power of ‘Just Looking’

Have you seen those Magic Eye 3D books? I came across one recently, and they are amazing!  Each book contains two-dimensional pictures that look like nothing more than random patterns repeated over and over again across the page. But – and here’s where the magic occurs – when you focus the eyes in a certain way while looking at the pictures, they suddenly transform from 2D into 3D, revealing a depth of image that is breathtaking. In fact, the 3D images appear so real it seems like you could reach into the page and touch them.

An advanced form of stereogram (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereogram), Magic Eye pictures work by manipulating a repeating pattern to control the perceived depth and hide a three-dimensional image in a two-dimensional pattern. When presented with a Magic Eye image, your eyes might each look at two different points. But the repeating image pattern tricks the brain into thinking the two spots are the same, which creates the perception of depth.

The trick is Have you seen those Magic Eye 3D books? I came across one recently, and they are amazing!

You have to relax the eyes, stop focusing on the image, and just look in order to get the 3D effect. Otherwise, you end up staring at the page and nothing happens. It takes some people a while to let go of their normal focus and perceive the 3D effect. But when it finally happens, the perception is stunning.

Why am I writing about this?

Because it reinforces two concepts I constantly talk about. One, the human brain is an amazing organ, capable of incredible feats of logic and intuition. Two, despite its awesome powers, our brain often causes us to see what we want to see rather than what is really in front of us. It does that because perception takes place far more in the brain than in the eyes, and that’s a critical concept for today’s business leaders.

When markets can change almost at the speed of light, one of the most valuable skills a business leader can have is the ability to look at the world and see things differently. Yet, we get so focused on looking at the “image” of our business that we don’t see changes in our customers or markets even when they’re right in front of us. Instead, we see what we already know about our business and our industry, so we continue doing things the same way. Then we’re shocked when a competitor comes along and eats our lunch by seeing things differently.

To make this even more difficult, not only do we need to see things as they really are, we also need to see things as they could be. In other words, we have to accurately perceive our current customers’ needs, and we have to imagine where they might be in six months to a year (maybe longer, depending on your industry). And that involves looking at the world without trying to force what we see into our preconceived ideas, attitudes and beliefs.

How do we get in the habit of “just looking” at the world? Try these suggestions from my new book Using Your Brain to Win:

  • Pause from time to time and ask, what if? What if we did it this way instead of how we always do it? What if we didn’t know anything about our business; what would we do differently to add value to our market? What if we could solve the biggest problem for our customers that nobody in our industry is solving?
  • Expand your sources of data, both internally and externally. If you typically only work with marketing or finance, make a point to talk with people in operations or customer service. Subscribe to newsletters, blogs or journals outside your industry. Visit trade shows and conventions that have nothing to do with your product.
  • Invite an associate to lunch and talk about their business. This will force you to think about your own business in new and different ways.
  • Stop jumping to solutions. The business world moves so quickly that when we have a problem or opportunity, we tend to grab the first good idea that comes along. Instead, put it aside and ask, what might we be missing here? How else could we approach this?

If you haven’t yet seen a Magic Eye image, visit their website (www.magiceye.com) or check them out at a bookstore. In the meantime, take a moment to pause and just look at the world around you without focusing on what you already know.  You’ll be amazed at what you might see!

Call to action: Do one thing to pause and just look today.

image credit: magic eye.com

BETA - Global Innovation Management Institute certification

Wait! Before you go.

Choose how you want the latest innovation content delivered to you:


Holly G GreenHolly is the CEO of THE HUMAN FACTOR, Inc. (www.TheHumanFactor.biz) and is a highly sought after and acclaimed speaker, business consultant, and author. Her unique approach to creating strategic agility, helping others go slow to go fast, will change your thinking.

This entry was posted in Build Capability, Innovation, Management, People & Skills, Processes & Tools, Strategy and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Magic Eye 3D and the Power of ‘Just Looking’

  1. SAY KENG LEE says:

    Hi:

    Thanks for a nice piece of writing, connecting the ability to view “Magic Eye 3D” pictures to a strategic skill of seeing the world with fresh eyes!

    Another way to describe the phenomenon in your article is the use of “splatter vision”, originally developed and practised by native American Indians in stalking their prey during hunting.

    I understand that this vital technique is currently been used, among others, by Secret Service agents on protection detail when the President has to be present in public places.

    By the way, how come your new book is not listed on amazon.com, or is it still a work in progress?

  2. Pingback: It Takes How Many Oldsters To Lift A Youngster? | Website Design

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Keep Up to Date

  • FeedBurner
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Slideshare
  • Email
  • YouTube
  • IPhone
  • Amazon Kindle
  • Stumble Upon

IX Community Members

SIMAnswers License Error: Unable to communicate with iono

Innovation Authors - Braden Kelley, Julie Anixter and Rowan Gibson

Your hosts, Braden Kelley, Julie Anixter and Rowan Gibson, are innovation writers, speakers and strategic advisors to many of the world’s leading companies.

“Our mission is to help you achieve innovation excellence inside your own organization by making innovation resources, answers, and best practices accessible for the greater good.”