100 Things to Watch in 2013

Adult Playgrounds, Chia Seeds and Instant-Erase Apps—just a few items from the annual list of 100 Things to Watch for the year ahead.

It’s a wide-ranging compilation that reflects developments that are bubbling up across sectors, including travel, technology, food, retail and sustainability. Many of the Things to Watch are tech-centric, including the proliferation of “appcessories,” digital ecosystems, flexible screens and responsive Web design. The list also includes new foods or ingredients to watch (faux meat, teff), new types of goods or businesses (quiet products, shopping hotels), new behaviors (mindful living, privacy etiquette) and ideas with the potential to ladder up to bigger trends.

Check out the list, along with a little bit about what makes each item worth watching, below.

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One Response to 100 Things to Watch in 2013

  1. Pingback: Trends für 2013: Welche Änderungen erwartet die Netzgemeinde im neuen Jahr?

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