Finding Innovation Help Next Door

Finding Innovation Help Next DoorOne of my favorite topics is to discuss how breakthroughs are generated by looking for someone who has solved a similar problem in a different space.

Some examples I talk about in my Best Practices Are Stupid books are:

  • A company developed a new type of whitening toothpaste by studying the way non-bleach laundry detergent works
  • A gas pipeline “sealing” system was developed by studying the way the capillaries in the finger coagulate blood and heal themselves
  • An office supply company found a way to get customers to return used toner cartridges by studying Netflix’s DVD service

And there are so many more interesting case studies.

While giving a speech on this recently, a client shared another wonderful example.

The company is in the computer simulation space. They are able to build incredibly realistic models of what might happen in the real world by creating simulations in the virtual world.

When working for a medical device company that made angioplasty equipment, they wanted to create a computer simulation that would predict how the “balloon” would expand.

Where did they turn for an accurate computer model?

In the past, they worked with car manufacturers and built statistical models that simulated the expansion and contraction of airbags. This proved to be a wildly accurate way of predicting how a balloon catheter would operate.

When you are working on your next business challenge, ask yourself:

“Who else has solved a similar problem.”

In doing so, you might significantly accelerate your innovation effort.

Clearworks - Customers, Connections, Clarity

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Stephen ShapiroStephen Shapiro is the author of five books including “Best Practices Are Stupid” and “Personality Poker” (both published by Penguin). He is also a popular innovation speaker and business advisor.

This entry was posted in Innovation, Open Innovation, collaboration. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Finding Innovation Help Next Door

  1. Clinton Bonner says:

    Great piece Stephen backed by concise examples. We routinely see near-field repurposing as an instrumental catalyst for problem solving and innovation. Had the privilege of listening to Dean Kamen at our Innovation Summit this past Sept. and a very good chunk of his discussion was on this very topic. Coincidental the imagery chosen for the post is a stent!

    Great post.

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  3. Woah this weblog is great i love reading your posts. Keep up the good work! You recognize, many individuals are looking round for this information, you can aid them greatly.

  4. Pingback: Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence | « learningservicesblog

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